ENG 011/111: Revisiting Your Reflection

Posted: May 4, 2020 in Teaching, Writing
Tags: , ,

Directions:

  1. Compose a short commentary (fifty words or more) on your reflection, and submit it as a response to this blog post. For recommended starting points for your commentary, see the list of questions below.
  2. After you post your response, read the reflective essay written by the classmate whose name precedes (not follows) yours on the class page, and post an assessment of twenty-five words or more on the student’s blog. If that classmate’s blog post is not accessible, comment on the post by the student whose name precedes that classmate’s. If your name is first on the list, comment on the reflection of the student whose name is last.

Questions to consider include the following:

  • Which assignments of yours and which features of the course served as the focus of your reflective essay? In the process of drafting your essay, did the focus change? If so, how?
  • How did you organize your reflection? Did you begin by defining or describing your subject, or did you start with an anecdote or observation? Is your essay a series of reflections that together create an overall impression?
  • Did Westover’s memoir, Educated, or one or more of the essays that you read in The Norton Field Guide to Writing serve as a model or source of inspiration? If so, which one? See the list below.
  • At what point in the process did you decide upon a title? Did you change the title during the writing process? If so, what was the original title?
  • What image that documents part of your writing process away from the screen did you include in your blog post? (Is it a photo of a page of your journal or part of your draft? Is it a photo of you reading, drafting, or revising?) Why did you choose that particular image?
  • What do you consider the strongest element of your essay?
  • If you had more time to devote to your final reflective essay would you have addressed additional assignments or features of the course? If so, which ones?

Reflections and Memoirs in The Norton Field Guide to Writing

  • Barrientos, Tanya Maria. “Se Hable Español.” The Norton Field Guide to Writing with Readings and Handbook. 5th ed., by Richard Bullock, Maureen Daly Goggin, and Francine Weinberg, 2019, pp. 693-96.
  • de la Peña, Matt. “Some Times the ‘Tough Teen’ is Quietly Writing Stories.” The Norton Field Guide to Writing with Readings and Handbook. 5th ed., by Richard Bullock, Maureen Daly Goggin, and Francine Weinberg, 2019, pp. 688-91.
  • Dubus III, Andre. “My Father was a Writer.” The Norton Field Guide to Writing with Readings and Handbook. 5th ed., by Richard Bullock, Maureen Daly Goggin, and Francine Weinberg, 2019, pp. 891-99.
  • Feslenfeld, Daniel. “Rebel Music.” The Norton Field Guide to Writing with Readings and Handbook. 5th ed., by Richard Bullock, Maureen Daly Goggin, and Francine Weinberg, 2019, pp. 81-84.
  • Kassfy, Ana-Jamileh. “Automotive Literacy.” The Norton Field Guide to Writing with Readings and Handbook. 5th ed., by Richard Bullock, Maureen Daly Goggin, and Francine Weinberg, 2019, pp. 84-86.
  • Lepucki, Edan. “Our Mothers as We Never Saw Them.” The Norton Field Guide to Writing with Readings and Handbook. 5th ed., by Richard Bullock, Maureen Daly Goggin, and Francine Weinberg, 2019, pp. 256-59.
  • Sedaris, David. “Us and Them.” The Norton Field Guide to Writing with Readings and Handbook. 5th ed., by Richard Bullock, Maureen Daly Goggin, and Francine Weinberg, 2019, pp. 883-89.
  • Tan, Amy. “Mother Tongue.” The Norton Field Guide to Writing with Readings and Handbook. 5th ed., by Richard Bullock, Maureen Daly Goggin, and Francine Weinberg, 2019, pp. 697-703.
  • Vallowe, Emily. “Write or Wrong Identity.” The Norton Field Guide to Writing with Readings and Handbook. 5th ed., by Richard Bullock, Maureen Daly Goggin, and Francine Weinberg, 2019, pp. 75-81.
  • Yousafazai, Malala. “Who is Malala?” The Norton Field Guide to Writing with Readings and Handbook. 5th ed., by Richard Bullock, Maureen Daly Goggin, and Francine Weinberg, 2019, pp. 900-04.
Comments
  1. surbernick says:

    The image I used as part of my off screen writing process was the notes I jotted down as I was reading the article by Matt de la Pena. It was not a long article so I did not have many notes but it was able to help me in my thinking process to lead from. I also used a photo of my children because they are my why and I enjoy being able to spend all this time at home watching them grow.

    • dresendiz21 says:

      For my reflective essay, I included a few of the assignments that I found helpful in my writing. As I was drafting my essay I began with writing about our assignment about writing a letter a month, turning away from technology when writing, and playing scrabble overall shaped my writing. If I would have had more time I would have included my summarizations in the journal of my reading assignments. By writing in my journal about my readings I would find myself having to recount what I had read and been able to support my readings with details.

  2. I decided to focus on the core elements that aided me as a writer in my reflection. They were studying student analyses from the Norton Field Guide to Writing and following the steps of the writing process. One analysis that I mentioned in particular was “The Fashion Industry: Free to Be an Individual.” I suppose that point would be the strongest segment of my essay due to the evident role it plays in my Writer’s OCD, which I named the reflection after. If I had more time to devote to it, I would say I would have addressed how my blogging’s entertainment drove me to write better.

  3. seimese says:

    The title of my essay was the last thing that came to me. In reflecting not only on this course, but on this year as a whole, I truly had no idea what to expect. There has been a lot of change in my personal life, and now in the world around us. Everything from the end of an almost eight year relationship which pushed me to go back to school, to moving, and the rather large and unexpected change of all classes being forced to go online due to COVID-19. We are, collectively, journeying into the unknown.

  4. javim31 says:

    i feel like the norton field guide help me build my essay and shape it just how it is supposed to be. i decide on a title when i realized how much the course made me truly think about what i was typing.the strongest part of my essay was the main body of it i really went into detail on in my reflective essay. if i had more time i would go do as many assignments as i could to get my grade to be the highest it can be,

  5. mauriciom553 says:

    I decided to include a picture of a scrabble board because when we played scrabble in class it was a break from the stress of homework and classes and it felt like we didn’t have a worry in the world. The Norton Field Guide didn’t seem like a very important book at the beginning of the semester but as we read it in class, I really enjoyed writing all the essays that famous authors or writers had created. I enjoyed the book so much that i even decided to keep reading it so I could improve my writing even more.

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