Posted in English 1103, Scrabble, Teaching

ENG 1103: “What’s in a Name?”

(L-R): Nicole Rice, Conner Horn, Nick Ewing, Katherine Murray)

  • Al: a type of East Indian tree
  • Alan: a breed of hunting dog (also alandalant)
  • Alec: a herring
  • Ana: a collection of miscellany about a specific topic
  • Anna: a former Indian coin
  • Barbie: a barbecue
  • Belle: a pretty woman
  • Ben: an inner room
  • Benny: an amphetamine pill
  • Bertha: a style of wide collar
  • Beth: a Hebrew letter
  • Biff: to hit
  • Bill: to charge for goods
  • Billy: a short club
  • Bo: a friend
  • Bobby: a policeman
  • Bonnie: pretty (also bonny)
  • Brad: a small nail or tack
  • Brock: a badger
  • Carl: a peasant or manual laborer (also carle)
  • Carol: to sing merrily
  • Celeste: a percussive keyboard instrument (also celesta)
  • Chad: a scrap of paper
  • Charlie: a fool
  • Chevy: to chase (also chivy)
  • Christie: a type of turn in skiing (also christy)
(L-R): Alina Zimavaya, Bella Phillipp, Sam Casey, Isabella Bertini

  • Clarence: an enclosed carriage
  • Conner: one who cons or deceives
  • Dagwood: a large, stuffed sandwich (named after the comic strip character who was fond of them)
  • Daphne: a flowering shrub with poisonous berries
  • Davy: a safety lamp
  • Deb: a debutante
  • Devon: a breed of cattle
  • Dexter: located to the right
  • Dom: a title given to some monks
  • Don: to put on a piece of clothing
  • Donna: an Italian woman of repute
  • Erica: a shrub of the heath family
  • Fay: to join together closely
  • Florence: a former European gold coin
  • Franklin: a nonnoble medieval English landowner
  • Fritz: a nonworking or semi-functioning state
  • Gilbert: a unit of magneto-motive force
  • Gilly: to transport on a type of train car
  • Graham: whole-wheat flour
  • Hank: to secure a sail
  • Hansel: to gift a gift, usually to commence a new year (also handsel)
  • Harry: to harass
  • Henry: a unit of electrical inductance
  • Herby: full of herbs
  • Hunter: a person or animal that hunts
  • Jack: to hoist with a type of lever
  • Jacky: a sailor
  • Jake: okay, satisfactory
  • Jane: a girl or woman
  • Jay: any of various birds, known for their crests and shrill calls
  • Jean: denim
(L-R): Mia Avelino, Carly Thompson, Ryan Hammelman

  • Jenny: a female donkey
  • Jerry: a German soldier
  • Jess: to fasten a strap around the leg of a bird in falconry (also jesse)
  • Jill: a unit of measure equal to to 1/4 of a pint
  • Jimmy: to pry open
  • Joannes: a Portugese coin (also johannes)
  • Joe: a fellow
  • Joey: a young kangaroo
  • John: a toilet
  • Johnny: a hospital gown
  • Jones: a strong desire
  • Josh: to tease
  • Kelly: a bright shade of green
  • Kelvin: a unit of absolute temperature
  • Ken: to know
  • Kent: past tense of ken
  • Kerry: a breed of cattle
  • Kris: a curved dagger
  • Lars: plural of lar: a type of ancient Roman guardian deity (also lares)
  • Lassie: a lass
  • Laura: an aggregation of hermitages used by monks
  • Laurel: to crown one’s head with a wreath
  • Lee: to shelter from the wind
  • Louie: a lieutenant
  • Louis: a former gold coin of France worth twenty francs
  • Mac: a raincoat
  • Mae: more
  • Mamie: a tropical fruit-bearing tree (also mamey and mammee)
  • Marc: the pulpy residue of fruit after it is pressed for wine
(L-R): Massimo Avelino, Ethan Rafferty, Spencer Lawe

  • Marcel: to make waves in the hair using a special iron
  • Marge: a margin
  • Mark: a line, figure, or symbol
  • Martin: any type of the bird also known as a swallow
  • Marvy: marvelous
  • Matilda (a hobo’s bundle (chiefly Australian)
  • Matt: to put a dull finish on (also matte)
  • Maxwell: a unit of magnetic flux
  • Mel: honey
  • Merle: a blackbird
  • Mickey: a drugged drink
  • Mike: a microphone (also mic)
  • Milt: to fertilize with fish sperm
  • Minny: a minnow
  • Mo: a moment
  • Molly: a type of tropical fish
  • Morgan: a unit of frequency in genetics
  • Morris: a type of folk dance from England
  • Morse: describing a type of code made of long and short signals
  • Mort: a note sounded in hunting to announce the death of prey
(L-R): Seth Cauble, Kylie Figueroa, Emma Sheridan, Charlie Milch

  • Nelson: a type of wrestling hold
  • Newton: the unit of force required to accelerate one kilogram of mass on meter per second
  • Nick: to make a shallow cut
  • Norm: a standard
  • Pam: the name of the jack of clubs in some card games
  • Parker: one who parks a motorized vehicle
  • Peter: to lessen gradually
  • Pia: a fine membrane of the brain and spinal cord
  • Randy: sexually excited
  • Regina: a queen
  • Rex: a king
  • Rick: to stack, hay, corn, or straw
  • Roger: the pirate flag
  • Sal: salt
  • Sally: to make a brief trip or a sudden start
  • Sawyer: one who saws wood
  • Shawn: past tense of show
  • Sheila: a girl or young woman
  • Sol: the fifth note on a diatonic scale (also so)
  • Sonny: a boy or young man
  • Sophy: a former Persian ruler
  • Spencer: a type of sail
  • Tad: a young boy
  • Tammie: a fabric used in linings (also tammy)
  • Ted: to spread for drying
  • Teddy: a woman’s one-piece undergarment
  • Terry: a soft, absorbent type of cloth
  • Tiffany: a thin, mesh fabric
  • Timothy: a Eurasian grass used for grazing
  • Toby: a drinking mug in the shape of a man or a man’s face
  • Tod: a British unit of weight for wool equal to twenty-eight pounds
  • Tom: the male of various animals
  • Tommy: a loaf or chunk of bread
  • Tony: very stylish
  • Vera: very
  • Victoria: a light, four-wheeled carriage
  • Warren: an area where rabbits live, or a crowded maze-like place
  • Webster: one who weaves
  • Will: to choose, decree, or induce to happen
  • Willy: to clean fibers with a certain machine

Bonus Point Opportunity!

The first student to correctly respond to the playable first names and last names question below will earn a bonus point for his/her/their first major writing assignment.

How many students in English 1103. 23 have a first or last that is a playable Scrabble word?

Directions for Finding and Submitting Your Answer

  1. Review the list of playable first names, compare it with the students’ first and last names on the class page, and determine which of the students’ first and last names are playable in Scrabble.
  2. Compose a response of one or more complete sentences that includes (1) the number of students with playable names, and (2) the first and last name of each student.
  3. Post your comment as a reply to this blog post.
  4. To post your comment, click the title of the post, “What’s in a Name. . . . ,” then scroll down to the bottom of the post. There you will see the image of an airmail envelope with a white rectangular box for your comment. Type your comment in the box and hit return. Voila! You have submitted your answer. Good luck!

4 thoughts on “ENG 1103: “What’s in a Name?”

  1. Nine students in the class have playable names. Two of these students only have playable last names: Nicole Rice and Katherine Murray. Four of these students only have playable first names: Nick Ewing, Spencer Lawe, Kylie Figueroa, and Emma Sheridan. Three students in the class have both first and last names playable in scrabble: Conner Horn, Charlie Milch, and Brock West.

  2. There are two students in class with playable scrabble names. These students are Spencer Lawe and myself, Nick Ewing

  3. Two students in our class have playable scrabble names, one being Nick and the other being Spencer. The names of the two students with playable names are Nick Ewing and Spencer Lawe.

  4. There are two students in our class that have playable scrabble names, which are Nick and Spencer. The names of the two students are Nick Ewing and Spencer Lawe.

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